Peter Cavanaugh

Blind faith

“Blind Faith” - an English blues rock band, composed of Eric Clapton, Ginger Baker, Steve Winwood, and Ric Grech – one of the first super groups from the late 60s.

“Blind Faith” - Unquestioned confidence or trust in a particular system of belief or given leader in which faith may equate to acceptance without readily evident rational proof, perhaps even contradicted by generally recognized reality.

“Blind Faith” - An astounding display of unqualified obeisance accompanied by dog-like loyalty demonstrated by Fourth District Congressional Representative Tom McClintock last Thursday night during his Town Hall meeting at Minarets High School. Upon the altar of political expediency, before a scattered crowd of concerned constituents and bored security guards, Thomas M. McClintock offered his eternal soul to Donald J. Trump, praise his name.

It seemed to come out of nowhere.

A gentleman asked the congressman in a respectful, diplomatic tone what would happen if the President went nuts and started a nuclear war. McClintock said there was no need to worry since such a thing could never happen.

He then proceeded to offer several minutes of polished prose explaining why numerous constitutional safeguards, levels of command authority and traditionally accepted safety guidelines would protect us all. He spoke with casual, persuasive confidence. He may even have quoted Lincoln, Jefferson or Thoreau – someone of classic stature. That’s standard in the McClintock playbook. I’m not sure - being thoroughly shaken by what came next. It’s like when you’re in an accident and just remember part of it?

Then it happened. All legalities aside, the questioner further pressed for a simple “Yes” or “No” on whether Trump could technically pull the trigger. It was with this exact phrase McClintock reluctantly admitted - “I believe he could - but he wouldn’t.”

Echoing the immortal words of Larry Verne in his 1960 classic, “Please, Mister Custer” - Please, Mr. McClintock, I don’t want to die.

Anyone who chooses to think a mad man is incapable of insanity may be legally free to offer his faith blindly, but should not be allowed to conveniently abandon our safety with it. Save the solicitous sanctimony for suckers, Mr. McClintock. This is for life on the planet. It’s sudden death hardball.

Against this unnerving blind belief that Trump is not clearly and presently dangerous in terminal terms, other frightening specifics on the immediate McClintock horizon are rendered pale by comparison.

A vote for McClintock means you are:

Supporting a Republican budget that will slash social spending to disproportionately reward the rich with billions of dollars at the expense of the poor, sick and elderly. The Middle Class will be left in the still shrinking middle, heading ever downward with increased velocity and no meaningful cut in taxes. Regulations? Who needs ‘em? Take down those traffic lights.

Endorsing without qualification a mumbling, bumbling, narcissistic oaf who permanently stains and tarnishes all he touches with egregious arrogance, fumbling foolishness and graceless grabs. I agree with Tom Woods, author of “The Seven Signs of a Sociopath.” Donald J. Trump is a malevolent toddler.

Aiding in the eventual gutting and/or elimination of many social safety nets, even those dating back more than seven decades to the administration of Franklin D. Roosevelt and his “New Deal.” In time this would even include Medicare and Social Security. Health care? It’s cash or crash. If you don’t earn for it, you will yearn for it. No pay. No play. Those who have get more – while those who don’t stay poor.

Horses wear blinders. Congressional representatives shouldn’t.

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