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Cal Fire grants for removal of dead and dying trees

Cal Fire offers funding for projects that focus on supporting efforts to remove dead and dying trees that pose a threat to public health and safety.
Cal Fire offers funding for projects that focus on supporting efforts to remove dead and dying trees that pose a threat to public health and safety. Submitted Photo

Cal Fire recently released guidelines for a grant program that combines the normal State Responsibility Area (SRA) funding with a special Tree Mortality (TM) funding allocation for a total of $15.75 million for projects that focus on supporting efforts to remove dead and dying trees that pose a threat to public health and safety.

Eligible applicants include local government (including fire districts, community service districts, water districts, or other special districts), Certified Local Conservation Corps, Fire Safe Councils, other nonprofit organizations, and tribal entities recognized through the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

The funds include $4.75 million in SRA funding which can be used for fuel reduction, planning, and education/training projects in rural areas of the state, including Eastern Madera County.

The remaining $11 million is allocated to the TM program for removal of dead and dying trees in the 10 tree mortality priority counties (Madera, Mariposa, Placer, El Dorado, Amador, Calaveras, Tuolumne, Fresno, Tulare, and Kern).

Qualifying projects and activities include those related to hazardous fuel reduction, fire prevention planning, fire prevention education, and removal of dead, dying, or diseased trees. Examples of qualifying projects and activities include, but are not limited to, the following:

Hazardous Fuel Reduction

Removing dead and dying trees

Vegetation clearance in critical locations to reduce wildfire intensity and rate of spread

Creation or maintenance of fuel breaks in strategic locations, as identified in Cal Fire Unit Fire Plans, a Community Wildfire Protection Plan, or similar strategic planning document

Removing ladder fuels to reduce the risk of crown fires

Community level fire prevention programs, such as community chipping days, roadside chipping, and green waste bin programs

Elective tree removal (thinning) to improve forest health to withstand wildfire

Modification of vegetation adjacent to roads to provide for safer ingress and egress of evacuating residents and responding emergency personnel

Reduction of fuel loading around critical firefighting infrastructure, including, but not limited to, fire hydrants, water drafting locations, and staging areas

Fire Prevention Planning

Wildfire risk or related mapping

Creation of strategic wildfire planning documents, such as a Community Wildfire Protection Plan (CWPP)

Removal of Dead, or Dying Trees

Must support area efforts to remove dead and dying trees that pose a threat to public health and safety.

Dead and dying trees greater than 10” in diameter and 20 feet in height, are reasonably accessible by equipment/machinery, can be removed within 300 feet of permanent structures and pose a structural threat to the residence (This does not include moveable or temporary sheds and outbuildings, or carports).

Dead and dying tree removal within 300 feet of serviceable roadways and pose a structural threat to roadways, or poses a threat to public or private infrastructure.

Projects should be located in a “Priority County” as identified by the Tree Mortality Task Force.

The maximum grant is $200,000, of which only $100,000 can be spent for equipment. Match is preferred but not required.

Grant applications are due 3 p.m., Sept. 28.

For application materials and guidelines, see http://goo.gl/A7gtjT.

Cal Fire

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