Local

Detwiler Fire grows to 7,100 acres in Mariposa County

The Detwiler Fire grew from 2,500 acres Sunday night to 7,100 acres Monday morning, Cal Fire reported.
The Detwiler Fire grew from 2,500 acres Sunday night to 7,100 acres Monday morning, Cal Fire reported. Submitted photo
 
 Posted by Mariposa County Sheriff's Office on Sunday, July 16, 2017

A fast-moving blaze about two miles east of Lake McClure in Mariposa County has grown to 7,100 acres and is 0% contained, Cal Fire reported Monday morning.

The Detwiler Fire, which started shortly before 4 p.m. Sunday, grew to 2,500 acres within five hours near Detwiler and Hunter Valley roads.

Evacuations and road closures were reported along Highway 49 from Pendola Garden Road to the intersection with Highway 132 in Coulterville, Hunters Valley Road, Bear Valley Road, Hunters Valley Access Road, and Detwiler Road.

At 4:10 p.m. Monday, mandatory evacuations were ordered for the Bear Valley community, with similar evacuations on Pendola Garden Road to Old Toll ordered 25 minutes later. At 5:25 p.m., evacuations were ordered for Mt. Bullion Ridge Road to the CYA Camp Road, and along Highway 49 from Pendola Garden Road to Mt. Ophir Road.

An evacuation center was established by the Red Cross in the Catheys Valley area, but moved to Mariposa Elementary School, located at 5044 Jones Street in Mariposa. The Red Cross is, among meals and health services, offering animal shelters for pets and those displaced by the blaze.

Fire advisories, not evacuation orders, have been issued in the areas of Pendola Gardens, on Bear Valley Road from Exchequer Road to Hornitos Road, the Hornitos town area, No. 9 Road to Mt. Gains, and Highway 49 from Pendola Gardens to Mt. Ophir Road.

At least one structure has reportedly been damaged, with another destroyed by the flames.

The cause of the fire remains under investigation. Crews are reportedly having difficulty battling the blaze as it is in an area with extremely steep hillsides, and smoke is causing disruptions to visibility while responders work in hot, dry temperatures.

  Comments