Debby Carter

Remember When | March 2019

First regular services were held at the new Community Church of Oakhurst last Sunday morning, with Rev. Kelsey Prinzing giving the sermon. A mass meeting for the purpose of soliciting public expression and to formulate plans for future activities is scheduled for this coming Sunday following the regular services.
First regular services were held at the new Community Church of Oakhurst last Sunday morning, with Rev. Kelsey Prinzing giving the sermon. A mass meeting for the purpose of soliciting public expression and to formulate plans for future activities is scheduled for this coming Sunday following the regular services. Special to the Sierra Star

60 Years Ago

· First regular services were held at the new Community Church of Oakhurst last Sunday morning, with Rev. Kelsey Prinzing giving the sermon. A mass meeting for the purpose of soliciting public expression and to formulate plans for future activities is scheduled for this coming Sunday following the regular services.

· A new ingenious little industry is the Sierra Worm Ranch, owned and operated by Bill and Estelle Bailey. Here, from “beds” of compost the Baileys are preparing to harvest a crop of millions of wriggling red earthworms for the eager fishermen who will soon be crowding the mountain lakes and streams.

· Next Thursday night the Oakhurst Civic League will bring to the people the important issue of Highway 49. To this end the league has invited discussions from three men who have worked unsparringly to bring about the extension of the Golden Chain Highway to Highway 41 in Oakhurst. They are William Sell, C. C. Clark, and “Del” Conrad.

50 Years Ago

· Oakhurst postmaster and Kiwanis secretary Warren Meharg addressed the Sierra Kiwanis Club at its weekly meeting. Meharg explained the function of “zip” and how important it has become in the speedup of United States mail.

· Ahwahnee Sanatorium, now being phased out as a medical facility, is being eyed by the California Council of Criminal Justice Region No. 7 Task Force on Juvenile Delinquency, to be used to provide educational and occupational training for 100 hardcore unemployed youths between 15 and 21 years.

· Ad for Colbern’s Department Store: Hey Girls! Flair Pants and Coordinated Tops from STRETCHINI by Bobbie Brooks from $8.95

40 Years Ago

· A&W Grand Opening. Come see the Great Root Bear in person! Free: A&W Hamburger; drawing for A&W Root Beer mugs; drawing for 3’ stuffed A&W Great Root Bear; iron-on patches; balloons for everybody; drawing for T-shirts. New National A&W Menu.

· Shopping Center Delayed Due to Lack of Water. Raley’s Still Planning Move to Oakhurst. Like the Sierra Meadows Convalescent Hospital, the shopping center has made arrangements to receive water from Developers Financial Corp. If Developers does not perform quickly, plans will proceed whereas the shopping center and the hospital will combine forces to put in a water system.

30 Years Ago

· Yosemite High School’s Caleb Roope won the first valley wrestling championship ever in the school’s history at the Central Section Meet at Arvin. Teammate Casey Lowry placed third overall and Yosemite placed ninth in the valley overall. Both Roope and Lowry qualified for the state meet which will be held this Friday and Saturday at the University of the Pacific in Stockton. [Caleb went on to place second in the state meet, while Casey finished in the top twelve.]

· James J. Sweeney, football coach at California State University, Fresno, was sentenced in Sierra Justice Court last week for driving under the influence. Sweeney was arrested July 8, 1988, on Road 200 east of O’Neals and charged with DUI. He was placed on five years probation; was sentenced to 180 days in jail with credit for two served and the other 178 suspended; he is to perform 40 hours of community service in Fresno; he was fined $970; is to participate in a first offenders program; and his license was restricted for 90 days.

· Another below normal precipitation year is taking its toll on the trees in the Sierra National Forest, states James Boynton, Sierra National Forest Supervisor. The drought induces a weakened condition in trees making them more susceptible to insect attack and other diseases that are present in the forest. “At lower elevations, tree mortality is three times greater than you would expect to find in a normal year.”

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