The Drosches, back row from left, Will, Ann, Mike, Jared, J.D., and Kevin; middle row from left, Lori, Robbie, Joel, Sharon and Vaughn; front row from left, Linda and Christian at last year’s annual Community Christmas Tree Lighting. Recently retired YHS teacher Ellen Peterson chose the Drosches to light the tree. “I have known the family for decades,” she said. “... have observed their care and parents love for every one of their children ... I knew the opportunity to participate would be memorable and magical.” Not pictured, Becky.
The Drosches, back row from left, Will, Ann, Mike, Jared, J.D., and Kevin; middle row from left, Lori, Robbie, Joel, Sharon and Vaughn; front row from left, Linda and Christian at last year’s annual Community Christmas Tree Lighting. Recently retired YHS teacher Ellen Peterson chose the Drosches to light the tree. “I have known the family for decades,” she said. “... have observed their care and parents love for every one of their children ... I knew the opportunity to participate would be memorable and magical.” Not pictured, Becky. Debbie Sebastian Special to Sierra Star
The Drosches, back row from left, Will, Ann, Mike, Jared, J.D., and Kevin; middle row from left, Lori, Robbie, Joel, Sharon and Vaughn; front row from left, Linda and Christian at last year’s annual Community Christmas Tree Lighting. Recently retired YHS teacher Ellen Peterson chose the Drosches to light the tree. “I have known the family for decades,” she said. “... have observed their care and parents love for every one of their children ... I knew the opportunity to participate would be memorable and magical.” Not pictured, Becky. Debbie Sebastian Special to Sierra Star

Dedication beyond the classroom

January 31, 2017 09:56 PM

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